“All right, how about this: I'll pick Oliver up and take him to practice, and you can go with Emily to the dentist.”

English Lesson: All right, how about this: I'll pick Oliver up and take him to practice, and you can go with Emily to the dentist.

You're talking with your wife, trying to manage your kids' schedules. You suggest a plan for tomorrow.

All right, how about this: I'll pick Oliver up and take him to practice, and you can go with Emily to the dentist.

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All right, (sentence)

"All right" is similar in meaning to "OK". It can be used at the beginning of your sentence to agree with what someone said.

All right, that sounds good.

You also say this when you've made a decision and are ready to announce it to people:

All right, how about this: I'll pick Oliver up after school and take him to practice, and you can go with Emily to the dentist.

How about (something)?

Ask "how about ___?" to suggest a choice:

A: What should we eat tonight?

B: How about pasta?

You can also use "What about ___?" in the same way.

Another way to use "How about ___?" is to suggest an action:

How about we stop arguing and start coming up with a solution.

"What about ___" doesn't work as well in this case.

"How about ___" is a casual phrase.

pick (someone) up

"Picking someone up" means driving somewhere to get them:

Can you come pick me up at the airport?

go with (someone) to (somewhere)

Use the phrase "go with ___ to ___" when one person needs to go to a place, but the other person isn't quite as needed. For example, if your family member needs to go to a doctor, you can offer to "go with" them:

Hey, do you want me to go with you to the doctor?

take (someone) to (some kind of) practice

If you have children who do activities like sports, you may need to "take them to practice".

A: Want to go out for a drink?

B: Sorry, I can't. I have to take my daughter to basketball practice.