“How long's it been since you clipped those suckers?”

English Lesson: How long's it been since you clipped those suckers?

Your roommate is wearing sandals. His toenails are really long, and it looks gross. You tease him about it.

How long's it been since you clipped those suckers?

How long has it been since (something happened)?

This is a way to ask about how much time has passed between a past event and now. Here are some examples:

How long has it been since you first started experiencing these symptoms?

How long has it been since you last saw him?

In casual English, you can contract "long has" to "long's":

How long's it been since we last got together?

clip (one's nails)

We use the verb "clip" to talk about cutting your fingernails or toenails.

that sucker / those suckers

In very casual speech, "sucker" can mean "thing". Here are some examples of things that you can call a "sucker":

  • a fish that you're trying to catch
  • a remote control that you're trying to find
  • a steak that you're putting on the grill to cook
  • your computer which recently broke

There's something lively-sounding about "sucker", so don't use it to talk about things which aren't doing anything interesting. 


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