“I don't really want to go, but I feel kind of obligated.”

English Lesson: I don't really want to go, but I feel kind of obligated.

Your coworker has invited you to her birthday party. Because you see her every day, you feel like you should attend, but you would rather stay home. You explain this to your room mate.

I don't really want to go, but I feel kind of obligated.

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kind of (adjective/adverb)

"Kind of" means "a little" or "somewhat". People often use it in spoken English:

I'm kind of shy when it comes to the opposite sex.

It kind of took me by surprise.

You can use "kind of" before an adjective ("kind of shy") or before a verb ("kind of took me by surprise").

Another phrase with a similar meaning is "somewhat":

Most students find that university courses are somewhat more difficult than the classes that they took in high school.

"Somewhat" is more formal. Use "kind of" for most situations and "somewhat" when discussing academic topics or in writing.

The pronunciation of "kind of" sounds like "kinda".

feel obligated to (do something)

"Feeling obligated" to do something means that you feel like you have to do it. You're afraid that it would be rude not to do it.

People usually feel obligated to do things for social reasons, like because a friend or neighbor asked them to do it. For instance, if someone gives you a gift, you might "feel obligated" to give them a gift back in return. We usually talk about "feeling obligated" to do things that we don't want to do.

You can use this phrase in a sentence like this:

I feel obligated to help because, you know, he helped us out a couple of months ago.

I don't really want to go, but I feel kind of obligated.

You can also tell someone not to feel obligated to do something:

Don't feel obligated to come if you're too busy.

I don't really want to (do something)

This is a way to admit that you don't want to do something:

I don't really want to eat out tonight.

When you add "really" it sounds a little softer than simply saying "I don't want to ___." This might sound angry:

I don't want to spend a lot of time on it.