“I feel obligated to give at least three weeks' notice at my current job.”

English Lesson: I feel obligated to give at least three weeks' notice at my current job.

You're on a job interview, and the interviewer offers you the job! However, he wants you to start immediately. You don't think that's possible because you haven't quit your job yet, so you say this.

I feel obligated to give at least three weeks' notice at my current job.

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give (#) weeks' notice

When you quit a job, it's bad to quit and stop going to work that day or the next day. Instead, you should "give notice" to your employer. That means telling your boss that you're going to quit.

In my experience in white-collar jobs in the U.S., three weeks' notice is standard and two weeks is the bare minimum.

feel obligated to (do something)

"Feeling obligated" to do something means that you feel like you have to do it. You're afraid that it would be rude not to do it.

People usually feel obligated to do things for social reasons, like because a friend or neighbor asked them to do it. For instance, if someone gives you a gift, you might "feel obligated" to give them a gift back in return. We usually talk about "feeling obligated" to do things that we don't want to do.

You can use this phrase in a sentence like this:

I feel obligated to help because, you know, he helped us out a couple of months ago.

I don't really want to go, but I feel kind of obligated.

You can also tell someone not to feel obligated to do something:

Don't feel obligated to come if you're too busy.

(someone's) current job

"Current" means "now". But you can't use "now" as an adjective. You can't say "my now job". Use "current" instead.

Here are some other things that people often describe using the word "current":


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