“I’m going to have you work with Martin for the first month or so.”

English Lesson: I’m going to have you work with Martin for the first month or so.

You're the manager of a software development team. There's a new programmer in your group who needs training. You tell her that one of the other employees will train her.

I’m going to have you work with Martin for the first month or so.

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(a period of time) or so

This is an expression for talking about time loosely. "The next week or so" means "about the next week". It could be in 5 days, in 10 days, etc.

I'll be travelling for the next week or so.

Other phrases that use "or so" include:

  • the first day or so
  • the last year or so
  • for an hour or so

For example:

This is one of the best songs I think I've heard in the last decade or so.

have (someone) (do something)

When you are in charge of someone, like an employee, you can "have them" do things for you. For example:

I'll have my assistant send you those documents later today.

Why don't we have the waiter bring us the check now so that we can leave quickly?

You also use this expression to ask someone to pass a message like this:

Can you have her call me?

I'm going to (do something).

You can talk about something that you've decided to do in the future with the phrase "I'm going to ___".

I'm going to drive Claire to the airport tomorrow.

Compared to "I will ___," "I'm going to ___" seems more certain to happen and more scheduled.


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