“She used to report to Amy, then she got promoted to Manager and Amy moved over to the Pricing department. ”

English Lesson: She used to report to Amy, then she got promoted to Manager and Amy moved over to the Pricing department.

You're talking to a coworker who's fairly new to your company. You've been at the company longer. You're explaining some of the history of your coworkers.

She used to report to Amy, then she got promoted to Manager and Amy moved over to the Pricing department.

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(someone) used to (do something)

You can talk about things that "used to" happen if:

  • it happened in the past
  • it happened more than 5 or 10 times (or for several weeks or months if it's something that's continuous)
  • it doesn't happen any more.

For example:

My friend Jeremy and I used to get together on the weekends and play Nintendo for hours at a time.

(someone) was promoted to (a position)

When a person gets a higher position within a company, you can say that the person "was promoted".

You can give information about the old job and the new job this way:

Did you hear that Jana was promoted from Sales Assistant to Account Manager?

You can also use the active voice:

Frank promoted Kenji to Copy Chief.

But this phrase is usually said in passive voice ("was promoted" or "got promoted").

Manager

"Manager" can be a job title in a company. For example, someone's business card might say:

Kelly Bond

Manager

But "manager" can also be a common description of someone's position:

My manager is such a jerk!

(someone) moved over to (a department)

When a person changes from one group to another within a company, you can say that they "moved over to ___":

Didn't she move over to the Digital team last year?

the (something) department

Areas of a company are called "departments". Each department usually has a name, like:

  • Sales
  • Production
  • Marketing
  • Logistics
  • Customer Service
  • Human Resources

You can either call the department by its name or say "the ___ department":

I think you'll need to talk to the Finance department about that.

(someone) reports to (someone)

You can explain who a person's boss is using the phrae "__ reports to __".

If your boss is named "Jay", then you can say:

I report to Jay.

The reverse of this is to "have people reporting to" someone:

She has six people reporting to her now.

This phrase is commonly used in professional jobs and office jobs. It sounds very respectable.

Another expression for this is "works under ___":

Do you still work under Dharmesh?

In other situations (like at smaller businesses or service jobs), you can say that a person "works for" someone:

I work for Marcus.

And that person is the other person's "boss" or "manager":

Marcus is my direct manager, and his boss is the owner.