“You hear about how nice it is there, and I thought, "Yeah, OK." But it totally lives up to the hype.”

English Lesson: You hear about how nice it is there, and I thought, "Yeah, OK." But it totally lives up to the hype.

You went to Hawaii for the first time on vacation. Now you're back at work and you're telling a coworker about your trip. You explain how much you enjoyed it.

You hear about how nice it is there, and I thought, "Yeah, OK." But it totally lives up to the hype.

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you

The word "you" doesn't always mean the person who you're directly speaking with. Sometimes it means "people in general" or "anyone".

Here are some examples of "you" used in a general way:

You need a solid foundation in basic math and science.

You can't beat face-to-face communication, you know?

In very formal English, you can use "one" instead of "you":

One is able to convey subtle nuances through face-to-face communication that are not possible to convey through other means.

how (adjective) (something) is

When you want to talk about the level or amount of a quality, you use the phrase "how ___ something is". For example, if it's been raining a lot and the ground is really wet, you can say:

I can't believe how wet it is.

Another example is when you meet someone who's famous and seems unfriendly, but he is actually a nice guy when you meet him:

I was surprised by how down-to-earth he was.

live up to (something)

"Living up to" something means meeting or matching an expectation that someone has. Here are a few things that something can "live up to":

live up to someone's expectations

live up to someone's standards

live up to a positive review

live up to one's potential

You can use it like this:

My parents set really high standards for me, and I haven't always lived up to them.

hype

"Hype" means really strong positive reviews or positive opinions about something. But "hype" itself is a negative word. So when you call positive reviews or opinions "hype", it means that you don't believe them.

Some examples:

Don't believe the hype.

There was a bunch of hype recently about this new social networking app. I can't keep up with all that.

Yeah, OK

Depending on how you say it, "Yeah, OK" can have several different meanings:

  • It can mean that you don't believe what someone said.

    He told me that he was a good dancer, and I was like "Yeah, OK." But it turns out he really is good.

  • You can say this when you accept someone's offer.

    A: Want to go grab lunch?

    B: Yeah, OK.

  • It can mean that you've understood what someone was saying and now you're annoyed with them.

    A: Don't forget to call me when you get there.

    B: Yeah, OK, mom. I've got it!