“I'm really sorry, but I won't be able to make it to New York next month.”

You live in New York. A friend was supposed to come to visit you from out of town next month, but he emailed to say that he can't come. This is what he wrote.

I'm really sorry, but I won't be able to make it to New York next month.

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I'm really sorry, but (sentence)

This is a way to introduce an apology. It's good for use with friends, but also with people you're not as close with. It's used to apologize for something that's you feel a little bit bad about, but not for really serious mistakes.

For a more serious situation, you would stretch out the apology longer. For example:

I have to talk to you about something. I made a really big mistake, and I'm so sorry. (Tell what you did.) Please forgive me.

I won't be able to (do something)

"Not able to" means "can't". So "I won't be able to" means that you can't do something in the future.

You use this expression when you are saying "no" to an invitation or changing a plan that you made:

I won't be able to stay for very long.

I'm really sorry, but I won't be able to attend.

make it to (somewhere)

The phrase "make it to ___" means to come to somewhere. You use this to talk about attending events or meeting people. There are a few situations that you can use "make it" in:

  • When you're telling someone that you won't come to an event, party or meeting:
    I'm really sorry, but I won't be able to make it to New York next month.
  • When someone comes to an event that you didn't expect them to come to, you show that you're surprised and happy:
    "Oh, you made it!"
  • When you ask someone if they're going to come to a meeting, party, or event:
    "We're going to have some people over for dinner on Saturday. We'd love it if you could make it."