“You remember how you used to always play that song on your dad's stereo?”

You run into a close childhood friend that you haven't seen in several years. You're talking to each other about the past. You say this to remind him of something that happened to you a few times when you were both kids.

You remember how you used to always play that song on your dad's stereo?

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You (do something/did something/adjective)?

In very casual spoken English, people sometimes start questions with "You" instead of "Do you" or "Are you". For example:

You OK?

You want something from the grocery store?

You remember how you used to always play that song on your dad's stereo?

You sent it already?

(someone) used to (do something)

You can talk about things that "used to" happen if:

  • it happened in the past
  • it happened more than 5 or 10 times (or for several weeks or months if it's something that's continuous)
  • it doesn't happen any more.

For example:

My friend Jeremy and I used to get together on the weekends and play Nintendo for hours at a time.

you remember (something)?

When you're asking a question to a friend or family member, you sometimes leave "do" out of the question. A more formal way to ask this question is:

Do you remember how you always used to play that song on your dad's stereo?

remember how (clause)

When you are remembering a past situation, you can say "remember that (something happened):

Do you remember that we dressed as super heroes for Halloween in fifth grade?

However, this only means to remember the fact that something happened. A good answer to this question would be just "yes" or "no". When you want to talk about remembering the experience of an event, you use "remember how (something happened)":

Do you remember how we dressed as super heroes for Halloween in fifth grade?

The proper response to this question is to describe some detail of that memory:

Yeah, I was Batman and you were Spider-man.