“I looked over your books, and I jotted down a few questions that I wanted to ask you.”

English Lesson: I looked over your books, and I jotted down a few questions that I wanted to ask you.

You're an independent accountant. One of your clients came to your office for a meeting. You tell the client that you want to ask some questions about the documents that she sent you last week.

I looked over your books, and I jotted down a few questions that I wanted to ask you.

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look over (something)

To "look over" something means to look at something to see if it's OK. In other words, it means to "check" something. For example:

I can look over your homework if you want.

In the example above, the speaker combines "look over" with "skim" to make the phrase "skim over". This means to look over the contract quickly.

jot (something) down

To "jot something down" means to write a short note. For example, in a meeting at work you might "jot down" a question that you want to ask someone later.

As with other separable phrasal verbs, the word "down" can go in two different places. It can go at the end:

I jotted it down.

Or it can go after "jot":

Can you jot down your phone number?

(someone's) books

You can call someone's financial records their "books":

You've got to keep your books accurate and up to date when you run a business, no matter how small.

People who maintain financial records for companies or individuals are called "bookkepers":

I need to hire a bookkeper.

questions (someone) wanted to ask (someone)

Use this phrase when you've prepared some questions for someone:

I have a few questions I want to ask you.