“I want to have plenty of money left over to leave to my grandkids.”

English Lesson: I want to have plenty of money left over to leave to my grandkids.

You're getting close to retirement age, but you want to keep working in order to save more money. You're explaining to a friend why you don't want to retire yet.

I want to have plenty of money left over to leave to my grandkids.

Join PhraseMix Premium or sign in to listen to this lesson and 2,273 others!

plenty of (something)

“Plenty” means that you have a lot, or more than enough, of something.

I’m not worried; we have plenty of time.

have (something) left over

This means that you have extra of something, after you use part of it. We often say this when we talk about food:

I have a lot of potatoes left over if you want to take some home!

But we can use it to talk about other things, too.

I have a bunch of craft supplies left over from her birthday party.

leave (something) to your family

When a person dies, their family usually receives some of their money and their possessions. If you’re planning for the end of your life, you might say this to explain that you want your family to receive something from you. 

I want to leave my home to my daughter.

This phrase can also be used in past tense:

He left everything to his nephew.

grandkids

This is a more informal way to say “grandchildren.”