“Thanks! I don't know if that's necessarily true, but it's nice of you to say.”

English Lesson: Thanks! I don't know if that's necessarily true, but it's nice of you to say.

You're speaking to someone at a party and you tell him how long you've been studying English. He says that you speak it really well considering the amount of time you've studied. You want to thank him for the compliment while seeming modest.

Thanks! I don't know if that's necessarily true, but it's nice of you to say.

I don't know if that's necessarily true.

"I don't know if that's necessarily true" means "That might not be true."

You can use this phrase to politely disagree with a statement that someone has made. For example:

A: You definitely need to have a degree in Computer Science to get a job as a computer programmer, right?

B: I don't know if that's necessarily true.

This phrase is more polite than "That's not true" or "That's wrong" because it leaves open the possibility that what the person has said might be true. "I don't know if..." and "necessarily" soften the phrase.

(It's/That's) nice of you to say.

When someone praises or compliments you, sometimes you accept the praise. You think that you deserve the compliment.

Other times, you don't think that the person's compliment is really deserved. You think that they're just saying nice things to you to be polite, or that their opinion of you is higher than it should be. In these situations, you can respond to the praise or compliment with "That's nice of you to say."

A: You have a great singing voice!

B: What? That's very nice of you to say, but I don't think so at all!

Sometimes people respond to compliments this way, even when they completely agree with the compliment, in order to seem polite and modest.

This phrase can stand on its own:

That's nice of you to say.

Or "say" can have an object:

It's nice of you to say that.

Or it can be in this form:

That's not true, but it's nice of you to say.

 


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