“Are you still pissed off at me about what I said this morning?”

English Lesson: Are you still pissed off at me about what I said this morning?

You had an argument with your boyfriend in the morning. This evening he's acting cold and distant. You ask if he's still angry.

Are you still pissed off at me about what I said this morning?

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(someone) is pissed off at (someone)

Being "pissed off" means being quite angry.

I am so pissed off right now!

You get "pissed off at" a person, or "pissed off about" an idea which makes you angry:

Are you still pissed off at me about what I said this morning?

"Pissed off" is a slightly rough phrase, so avoid it in polite situations with people you don't know well. 

what (someone) said

Use the phrase "what ___ said" in sentences like these:

I really liked what Obama said in that speech. 

What you said made a lot of sense.

Tell me what she said.

In other words, "what ___ said" turns a person's words into the subject or object of a sentence.

(someone) is (emotion) about (something)

You can usually use this structure to talk about the way someone feels about an event or topic.

She’s worried about her exam tomorrow.

They’re excited about the field trip.

this (morning/afternoon/evening)

"This morning" means the morning today. You can use it to talk about something earlier or later:

What time did you leave this morning?

What time are you leaving this morning?

"This afternoon" and "this evening" work the same way:

I had coffee with Mr. Hernandez this afternoon.

Hey, are you doing anything this evening? I was invited to this party and I was wondering if you'd like to join me.