“Don't you think you're rushing into things?”

English Lesson: Don't you think you're rushing into things?

Your friend tells you that he's going to ask his girlfriend to marry him. They've only been dating for a month, so you're worried that it's a bad idea. You say this.

Don't you think you're rushing into things?

Audio by native English speakers

Don't you think (something)?

This is a way to introduce an opinion carefully. If you're worried that your opinion might make the listener angry or that they might disagree with you, ask this way:

Don't you think we should go back now?

Don't you think you should ask your boss for a raise?

You can also say "Don't you think that ___?"

Don't you think that you should call them and let them know that you're OK?

(someone) is rushing into things

"Rushing into things" means making a big decision too quickly. You can tell people not to "rush into things" when they quickly decide something like:

  • buying a house
  • moving to a new country
  • quitting their job

People use this phrase in sentences like:

Let's not rush into things.

Don't you think you're rushing into things?

No need to rush into things.